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In this article Dr. Fielder explains why he prefers to call himself Hygienist and Nature Curist, rather than Naturopath. And about how Nature Cure today is often mistaken for Naturopathy, even though there is a quantum leap between them:
"Naturopathy is only another form of medicine with many of its 'remedies' being equally as harmful as those of the medical profession."

Natural Hygiene, Nature Cure & Naturopathy


John Fielder Although one of the disciplines I have been trained in, along with Osteopathy, Chiropractic, Natural Hygiene and Biogenic Living, is Naturopathy, I would prefer to not refer to myself as a Naturopath, or lay any claim to practicing Naturopathy. In fact I would describe myself as an Hygienist and Nature Curist who is a Lifestyle Consultant. The following treatise is my endeavour to outline and explain why this is so.

“As a movement Hygiene was launched in 1832 when Sylvester Graham gave his first series of lectures in New York.” So wrote Shelton in Vol 1, The Hygienic System, sub-titled Orthobionomics, pp10. He further goes on to say,”Graham was soon joined by Isaac Jennings, a physician of the old school, who had discovered for himself the fallacies of medical theories and futilities and the dangers of medical dosing, and William Alcott, also a regular physician who had discarded drugs and the lancest, and a little later by Russell Thecter Trall, another physician of the old school who had become convinced of the radical unsoundness of medical theory and practice.”

In Europe we saw a similar awakening occurring, commencing with Vincent Preissnittz, Louis Kuhne , Adolph Just, Theodor Hahn and Arnold Rikli to mention a few of the early pioneers, all of whom, at this stage, were lay people, who by their own illness or observation realised the harmfulness of drugs and medical theory and practice.

The early pioneers of Hygiene in America had their dietary regime moulded by the thoughts and practice of Sylvester Graham who advocated the use of fresh fruits and vegetables, and a vegetarian diet. He is best remembered f or his Graham Crackers, a whole grain cookie.

In Europe the emphasis in the early stages was less stringent, nevertheless it was advocated that the rich foods which were popular at that time be forsaken in preference to simple diet of whole foods. By the turn of the century the dietary regime of Nature Cure was firmly based upon vegetarianism.

We also see, at this stage, many of the early Hygienists such as Trall et al, travelling to Europe to study the methods of the early Nature Curists.

By this time the followers of Preissnitz, many of whom were medically trained, had taken his methods to an extreme and had introduced many heroic methods which were, if not more harmful than the medical drugs, were equally so.

It was these medically trained people, such as Hahnemann, the father of Homeopathy, who gradually usurped the teachings of Nature Cure till today it is generally believed that Naturopathy and Nature Cure are synonomous.

Naturopathy is alternative medicine, using many and varied forms of so-called “alternative” remedies. In reality it is only another form of medicine with many of its “remedies” being equally as harmful as those of the medical profession.
It requires very little effort to move from the use of medical drugs to those of alternative medicine. Whereas on the other hand it takes a complete mind change, a “quantum leap” follow the principles laid down by Hygiene and Nature Cure.

Nature Cure eschews all forms of medication and “cures” as does Hygiene.


John Fielder

1-27-04

Continue to The Effect of Music on Physiology by Dr. Fielder



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